Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

The reserve is beautiful in any weather

Thursday, February 17th, 2011

In cold, wet, blustery, wintry weather, it’s tempting to curl up on the couch and lose yourself in TV or the Internet. Here’s a nice quote about cycles and seasons from Rachel Carson, author of The Edge of the Sea and Silent Spring:

Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of the birds, the ebb and flow of the tides, the folded bud ready for the spring. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature – the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the winter.

— Rachel Carson

San Vicente Creek Is Roaring

Monday, December 20th, 2010
footbridge closed

High water in San Vicente Creek around December 20th threatened to wash away the footbridge, but it has been declared safe and will remain open for the foreseeable future.

Ranger Sarah Lenz reports:

UPDATE 12/27/2010: The erosion of the banks of San Vicente Creek was not as bad as first believed! After reassessing the situation, the footbridge near the main parking lot is once again OPEN and will remain so for the foreseeable future. The bridge had been closed for a couple days in the week leading up to Christmas, blocked off with barricades and tape, during very heavy rains. (more…)

What’s That Tower?

Thursday, December 9th, 2010
tower

The former signal tower is a resting place for sea birds.

What’s the concrete tower that projects above the surface of the water at the edge of the reef at Seal Cove?

This storm-battered bastion is a relic of World War II, during which the Navy built Half Moon Bay Airport. From the airport, the Navy flew aircraft that towed targets used for gunnery practice by anti-aircraft guns situated in Montara!

When target practice was scheduled, a red flag was hoisted over the marker in Seal Cove as a warning to other aircraft and commercial fishermen in the area.

Today, the concrete sentinel functions as a roosting shelter for gulls and cormorants.